TRANSITION FROM NUCLEAR POWER

Nuclear power is melting down thanks to rising costs and widespread safety concerns.

In June 2013, after the decision to close California’s San Onofre nuclear power plant, its owner, Southern California Edison, started transferring almost $5 billion in failed repair and decommissioning costs to ratepayers.

The Earth Policy Institute notes:

  • “For the world as a whole, nuclear power generation peaked in 2006, and dropped by nearly 14 percent by 2014.

  • “In the United States, the country with the most reactors, nuclear generation peaked in 2010 and is now also on the decline.

  • “U.S. nuclear power is becoming too costly to use, as the cost of operating aging U.S. plants is rising five percent per year.

  • “The world fleet of nuclear power plants averages 28 years in age, begging the question of whether to repair older plants or simply close them.

  • “Four U.S. reactors were retired in 2013 because it did not make economic sense to continue operations.

  • “As of late 2014, some 31 countries were still operating nuclear power plants, but scarcely half as many – mostly countries with centrally planned economies – were building new ones.”

To show you welcome the transition to 80% renewable non-nuclear electricity by 2050, please sign to support this ballot initiative so we can get a person to gather your signature on the required paper version of the I-180 signature sheet by clicking HERE.

For more on this topic see the Nuclear Power in Decline chapter in “The Great Transition.”

This page last edited 3/31/16.

Home of Montana (MT) Community Affordable Renewable Energy Saves; Paid for by MTcares, Inc., Pam Ellis, Treasurer, Billings MT 59105